Rain

image_pdfimage_print

This week’s Indie Ink Writing Challenge was a good one for me; I love this subject.

I challenged The Onion, who did a nice job on her challenge, and my challenge this week comes from Jan. “Rain. What does it do to you? Write about a memory or a story that involves some powerful emotions and rain.” I amended it slightly because there isn’t one specific story to tell, but there are several small vignettes.


When it is raining outside, when it is pouring down and thundering through the sky, I sleep better than any other night. Even if it is just a light rain, the water pattering on the roof and the windows lulls me to sleep and holds me there all night until I wake, rested. I don’t always sleep very well, so when the rain comes it is a boon.

I sometimes sit outside and watch the rain fall on the plants that need it so much here. There is little rain, so it feels like the plants expand to catch all they can when it does come. I’m probably anthropomorphizing, but I can live with that.

I grew up in a place where it rained fairly often. It was generally a warm rain, so, when we were very little, our mother would let us go outside in almost no clothes and play in the puddles in the backyard. I would turn my face up and catch rain on my tongue, feeling it sliding over my face and into my hair. When we came inside, she would dry us off, tell us to get dressed, and sometimes, if we were lucky, she would make tomato soup and grilled cheese sandwiches. I still love that as a meal.

I used to ride to school in the rain. I would take off my glasses and just go, everything in my backpack bagged so it wouldn’t get wet, no worries. I felt free, speeding down hills and meandering up them. I could ignore the traffic more easily because of the sound of the rain. I would get to school soggy and dripping, but the pool had warm showers after swimming practice anyway, so by the time I went to class I was warm and happy.

When I separated my shoulder and was impatient for it to heal, the rain would calm me enough that I could sit and read for hours. Some days I would pace, wanting to be moving more than I could, but rainy days I could settle and be glad that my arm had a chance to heal without more damage.

Rain brings me peace. Rain helps me remember spring, something in short supply in the desert. Rain keeps me from feeling lost and alone. Hot chocolate or cider when the day outside is dark and dripping feels cozy and comforting. Sometimes, on very bad days (of which there have been a few lately), a hard rain will come to the desert, and I will go out and stand under our huge maple tree, letting the rain pour down from the sky and pound all of my pain into the ground. I can feel my muscles relax as the water soaks me to the skin. I need the rain to be happy, I think, and sometimes I miss it a lot living here. Someday I will go back to a rainy place and I will remember more of why I love it.

9 thoughts on “Rain

  1. aw, yes. i have lots of lovely rain memories, too. this is just very soothing to read. and this sentence made me guffaw: “I’m probably anthropomorphizing, but I can live with that.” hee!

  2. This is beautiful! I love the way you talk about how rain makes you feel and the associated memories. It has been rainy and cold here and this makes me feel good about the rain rather than gripe. Great job!

  3. What a lovely visual imagery. I love standing in the rain. Where I grew up, it was a tradition (Mostly self-created) to get completely wet in the rain. Oh what a good feeling that was. Beautiful post.

  4. I too sleep better when it’s raining. I love you for our similarities. This was wonderfully done, Wen. The imagery is gorgeous.

  5. This is stunning and heart warming. It is winter in Cape Town and raining here. I’ll stop complaining about it now and do as you do, simply enjoy it.

  6. haven’t been around in a while, but it’s good to read you again. the rain feels like a healer in this piece, really brought together with the separated shoulder stillness it provided. nice.
    hope you are doing very well.

Comments are closed.